How to Get Your Compost Ready for Summer

Get the summer compost that you deserve.

Use these tips for the nutrient-rich compost you deserve

Get Your Compost Ready for Summer

Spring is here, well kind of, and that means that it’s time to start thinking about getting your compost ready for summer. Here are a few tips to help make your compost piles both bountiful and efficient.

  1. It’s no secret that the two most important factors in composting are carbon and nitrogen, so make sure to save your grass clippings and leaves from spring raking. By having a proper balance of carbon and nitrogen rich materials you ensure a steady rate of decomposition and nutrient-rich compost for your garden.
  2. Keep compost ingredients small. Composters should always remember that the smaller items are, in size, the easier they decompose.
  3. Remember the ‘Rule of 3’ with respect to your compost pile’s size (3’ x 3’ x 3’). Compost piles that follow the ‘Rule of 3’ generally thrive as it enables compost to ‘heat-up’ and decompose at a more efficient rate. Geobins fit those dimensions well.
    1. Note: Make sure to check the middle of your compost pile every few days to make sure it’s ‘hot.’ This ensures that decomposition is taking place.
  4. Air and water are necessities for humans. This is also the case for creating nutrient-rich compost. By constantly turning your compost (typically with a pitchfork) you’re keeping the decomposition process efficient as all parts of the compost are getting exposed to air at one point or another. Moisture is also important. Healthy compost piles should resemble a wet-sponge, this means that (depending on what climate you’re in) you’ll need to either add water on a consistent basis or cover your compost pile from absorbing too much moisture. Healthy amounts of air/water promote microorganisms to work faster—so you get the decomposition rate you’re looking for.

By following these few simple steps, and putting in minimal effort, you can turn your ‘garbage’ into nutrient-rich compost. Not only is compost great for your garden, but there is no cost associated—so, what are you waiting for?